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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
days but it would take three long weeks for those ends to hatch. the civil rights movement taught me patience, to never give up and never give in but keep your eyes on the prize, so this book, "across that bridge," is about patience, about steady hope, truce, love and reconciliation. when i was growing up in alabama, visit the tuskegee and later starred in national tennessee and lived in alana. sissons salles white men, colored men, white women, colored women. when i was a child with my mother, father, parents and grandparents why? and they would say that's the way it is. don't get in the way. don't get in trouble. but 1955 at the age of 15i heard of rosa parks. i heard of martin luther king, jr.. at the age of 17 aye rosa parks. the next year at the age of 18i met dr. martin luther king jr.. the action of rosa parks to the people of montgomery and teaching the leadership of dr. king inspired me to get in the way to get in trouble so for more than 50 years i've been in trouble, unnecessary trouble. [applause] so, across that bridge is a lesson about getting in trouble, and that's wha
important novel for african-americans to articulate civil rights. it exhibited an enormous influence not just and other writers but on leaving political figures and social activists. so without "uncle tom's cabin" you rich without strong, written very much to model. he wanted to model his work during the reconstruction era after "uncle tom's cabin." james baldwin famously in 1955 publishers the screen against "uncle tom's cabin." but for him, too, in the 1950s he says no novel has ever exerted over him like the power of "uncle tom's cabin." it's the sentimental power of this novel that last very much to the present day. >> watch booktv all weekend to see more of our recent visit to augusta, maine. for more information on this and other cities visited by booktv's local content vehicles go to c-span.org/localcontent. >> antonio mendez presents his book, "argo," at the international spy museum in d.c. arco details the story of six americans who escaped from the u.s. embassy during the iran hostage crisis in 1979. the cia operation to find and get them out of the country involved cia off
from latino civil rights leader caesar chavez. the president and national latino leaders dedicated a new national monument for chavez today. we have a flurry of new tv ads to dissect. we're going to get to at least a couple we hope. first one, let me ask you, michelle, the romney campaign released a new tved a with a liar argument. here is a part of it. >> president obama continues to distort mitt romney's plan. the latest not telling the truth about the tax plan. even the obama campaign admitted it wasn't true. >> jennifer: actually i'm going to ask this one of karl, because the romney campaign isn't telling anybody whether the ad is running. >> i think it's disenginous and ironic that they would release an ad calls lying, and not tell anybody where it is returning. if you want to give 20% tax cuts to every american that is $5 trillion. what is difficult is to get really detailed on romney's plans when they are not laid out specifically. so what you find from the fact checkers is that they are not being completely accurate but they always put in there the discl
and committed civil rights violations. the lawsuit is seeking $3 million. >>> our time is 6:37. in nine minutes we'll go into the kitchen. >> we can smell the success right now in the studio. you'll want to stay tuned for that. howard says we'll have a nice day. the showers you see now are moving out. highs in the 80s. wait till you hear about the fantastic friday and a look at the weekend ahead. keep it here. ♪ [ harry umlaut ] hey you know what, i speak european. [ sally umlaut ] european isn't a language. i think they speak all kinds over there. nah. it's basically one language with a few variations. my cousin has a passport. uh-huh. take this fascinating muller yogurt. frut up. means "fruit up." as in creamy yogurt down below. and a delectable, aromatic layer of blended fruity, moussey, uppiness on top. frut up. as the europeans say. in their language. wow. you really are bilingual. yeah, i dated a comma in high school. [ male announcer ] muller. the european for yummy. >>> good morning. welcome back to 9news now at 6:42 and 73 degrees. monika is out this week. i'm beverly farmer checking
how african- americans were able to drive legislations in the civil-rights movement and say as a blueprint, let's take the amount of resources we have and you put that with voting and you have a different result. >> we me to go back to that same model and make sure we implement that in this next term. >> if anybody could jump in and answer this, and that is, let's say you go through november, let's say president, democrats, 50% holds up. 90% of black folks hold up. are you going to see african- americans and hispanics make it clear that they have to have an inside and outside game, and that is you have folks on the inside who say we are working with you, but then the extra forces on the outside who are also pushing as well to get what you want, and otherwise be risks folks saying let's don't have an extra row game, all of you are left with is an internal dane, and we can ignore it. that is a danger when it comes to getting what you want. >> i think every time you put all your eggs in one basket there's a danger they will get broken. i disagree that is what happened. the last
they say it vital their civil rights and causing outrage on both sides. >> having to put a sign on your door on halloween is like branding somebody. so when it's a scarlet letter or it's a yellow star of david for the nazi germany, you know, it's something that distinguishes everybody and actually makes them an outcast in their own community. >> i think it's a reasonable ordinance that the city has passed to help protect and keep us a safe city. >> gretchen: giving us the take is the host of "justice," judge jeanine pirro. all right. so i'm a parent. he's a parent, you're a parent. if you go out trick or troating with your kids, you night want to know if you're going to the house of a sex offender. >> you're right. the first obligation of government is protection of its citizens. as i listened to that attorney say it's like branding them, first of all, you can't even compare a predator pedophile to someone who is a victim of a holocaust. but let's get past that. they say it's a violation of their civil rights, first and 14th amendments, protected speech. that's hogwash. here is the bott
line higher education, business officials, civil rights groups that allied support for the use of race and the university of texas, swamp the number of briefs that are in opposition, but if you look at the broader public opinion, it appears that only about one-quarter of the u.s. population supports the idea of racial preferences in college admissions. by contrast, you will see in the second set of figures, the blues set of figures, there is quite broad support among the very same set of voters for preferences in college admissions based upon income. now, given these it is not surprising that we -- lord -- ward connerly has been extremely successful in his effort to ban affirmative action based upon race in a number of states. so far, those efforts are five other six times voters, when given the option has said we should end racial consideration in college admissions and public employment. including blues states. the second major problem facing affirmative-action is the legal issue by -- which will be joined in the fisher case. many people expect the u.s. supreme court is going to occu
for looking at all these forces that were set in motion, women's rights, civil rights, all wedded to what i hope to be a very captivating yarn about a detective and his wife who come into possession of two diaries that offer secrets about the lincoln assassination. >> tim, lincoln is hot to death right now. there's your book about lincoln, steven carter wrote a book "the impeachment of abe lincoln." there was a movie "lincoln vampire hunter. qrequesting requesting of course, the daniel day-lewis movie which comes out next month. >> congress must never declare equal those who god created unequal. >> leave the constitution alone. >> stepped out on the world's stage with the fate of human dignity in our hands. blood has been spilled to afford us this moment, now, now, now. he really looks like lincoln, but the question is why is lincoln so hot right now? >> i think lincoln has always been hot. he's one of those mythical figures in american history, and i think we as a society revisit him from time to time because he's so compelling, and i think the lincoln conspiracy is an effort to recapture
is right outside the door here, and you'll be staying for signing. >> i will. and as a civil servant of the government, i don't receive any royalties, so the price has been set very low, and i hope you all enjoy it. [laughter] >> let's talk a little bit about the idea that these machines have proceeded us to mars. is it still, ultimately, the target to put a human being there? >> for sure. and it's sometimes very surprising if you talk -- all of the scientists i spoke to really want to be there. they, they sense that they need to be there in order to do exploration the way it should be done. and part of it has to do with all those limitations that i talked about. they all want to go in different places. we'd accomplish a lot more with six people than six people standing on a skateboard together. and i think your point, though, about anticipating or preparing has become more and more real. i don't think we understood that so well before mer. that we could for reasonable cost put these rovers in different places around mars and figure out where would we want to go, where should we land
important. the most important civil right is voting. it's with everything else relies on, and the disenfranchisement isn't a casual thing even if it doesn't turn and the election if somebody can't vote in a state that is solid blue or solid red that is also because that person hasn't been able to participate with it changes the outcome, but i think that with the nfl rapid which did get that strike or lockout rather did get settled very quickly after every book on the national television saw the game that went the wrong way, and tragically at me make something like that for the voter i.d. and suppression to get not only the media attention but the judicial attention that it deserves. >> i want you to join in here. so, it from the data perspective the voter suppression is extremely small. i have no idea what the right percentage should be but it is under 1% and another one of the topics that is just way down that we believe should be more a part of the coverage is the money in politics, so the fund raising is just a sliver of the percentage. one of the things we are trying
, obviously, that she think there should be no civil rights distinction, none whatsoever, between a committed gay couple and a committed heterosexual couple. if that's the case, we really don't have a difference. >> is that what your said? >> your question to him was whether he supported gay marriage and my answer is the same as his and it is that i do not. >> wonderful. you agree. on that note, let's move to foreign policy. [laughter] >> you both have sons who are in iraq or on their way to iraq. you, governor palin, have said that you would like to see a real clear plan for an exit strategy. what should that be, governor? >> i am very thankful that we do have a good plan and the surge and the counterinsurgency strategy in iraq that has proven to work, i am thankful that that is part of the plan implemented under a great american hero, general petraeus, and pushed hard by another great american, senator john mccain. i know that the other ticket opposed this surge, in fact, even opposed funding for our troops in iraq and afghanistan. barack obama voted against funding troops there after promi
kinds of things. the civil rights act of 1964? if you're a libertarian might sound reasonable. if you apply for a job and the employer and employee agree on a salary, who's the government to get in there? some people in this country have decided discrimination is bad. that was todd akin coming out in favor of discrimination in the workplace not just against women. against anybody. so what's to stop a business from not hiring people of a race or religion or sexual orientation they don't like? under todd akin, nothing right? yeah, what a guy. so i'm going to have you play that about four times during this episode. i think it's more shocking than legitimate rape. 1-866-55-press. i'm john fuglesang filling in for bill all morning on your current radio and tv, this is the "bill press show." we'll be right back. >> announcer: this is the "bill press show." live on your radio and current tv. >> announcer: heard around the >> announcer: this is the "bill press show." >> john: this is the "bill press show." this is
? >> wow. >> before the civil rights act was passed was the last time we had a president from massachusetts win ask i'm not saying mitt romney is a bad guy. i'm sure he's a nice guy, but i will say that if i was going to write a movie and create a bad guy orvilleen, i would have them be a really, really wealthy out of touch guy who stashes his money in cayman bank accounts and fires people for a living. >> you know, because he likes to fire people. >> he likes being able to fire people. >> and get him -- get him a car garage for his vacation home. >> car elevator. >> elevator, yes car elevator. there are so many things about mitt romney. we could go on and on. i'm sure i's a very nice man has a good family. i saw his sons out in iowa. there's something that disturbs me about the way mitt romney is running for president. it's almost like he wants to go back in time. i saw him and he would talk about how great america was and barack obama wants to change america to make it great. i want to go back to what made america great in the past. it's like he wants to go back to some time period when h
of the poor and study the indifference to civil rights. a lot who lived through it seemed to think the best thing about george bush, he is not ronald reagan. ♪ ♪ >> largely as as a result of the policy and priority of reagan administration, more people are becoming poor and staying poor in the country than many times since world war ii. ♪ >> if there's anything left ronald reagan trickle down theory it seems to be anxiety which seems to be trickle down through every segment of our society. ♪ if you give complearns thomas a little flower you think you have david talking. here is a man who is against everything that has lifted the level of life of -- [inaudible] ♪ i egg and butter many black men do a [inaudible] >> has hard too. he's remember rehenceble person. ♪ your words trickle down terrorist who face their agenda on division, exclusion, and fear. do you think middle class americans are in need of protection. ♪ the new republican majority congress took a big step on the legislative agenda to demolish or damage government-aid programs many of them designed to help children an
of mothers and accommodation in the church in washington, d.c.. set about right after the civil war and determining how they could provide help particularly to blacks and a variety of disadvantaged in the d.c. area and initially establish what was a seminary and that very quickly martin to the university. so, howard university was founded. you put them on the reservation it would be okay but in terms of his treatment of blacks and his involvement he's also called the christian general because depending on the perspective he was either very powerful or very righteous. he did expect that his troops would comport themselves in the highest christian manner that there are also suggestions he was preaching and maybe not the easiest guy to live with and when you really want to do is smoking cigarettes and have a drink. the reich righteousness i think carries him without life and he makes no apologies for ret but he's also a singled out because of it and certainly on many of the biographies that have been published. ultimately i mentioned earlier that he was the superintendent of west point
strong. you know, right up prior to the war. that's how big the u.s. army was. during the civil war, the army expanded to, you know, 3 million people, two and a half million or so in the north, and this meant that the amount of case work that he had to oversee was extraordinary, and he also was given responsibility for pursuing civilians who were engaged in disloyal acts, treasonnist behavior and so on. although, he didn't pursue every case or serve on every case himself, obviously, a lot of court marshalls on the field and so on, it was his responsibility to make sure as much as he could justice was prevailing in the cases and that punishment was meeted out as it should be and people's rights were protected. it is a massive assignment way past the end of the war. he stayed in that position until 1875 so-dramatically expanded position, and he also had the role in that position of making law, so much law about war didn't even exist because this was a war of the likes which the united states had never seen. to many, many policies around how the war should be conducted and so it needed
and i think they succeeded really well. see our next question comes from steven right here in civil -- silver springs maryland in the suburbs. high steven. >> caller: i would like to ask particularly david and julie, someone who is writing his own book on president nixon, i would be very interested to find out what if any advice president eisenhower they have given to president nixon on an informal basis about how to conduct the war in vietnam? >> we talk about it quite extensively in "going home to glory," we discovered an effective cover that in a certain way and i think it was, what happens in late 1967 and attackers is wonderful account the richard nixon wrote that was basically his last business meeting with dwight eisenhower. and what i see here is that by eisenhower was somebody who knew two things and first of all in his era he knew the nature of the soviet communism and he knew america's important than sort of holding up and defending the free world but he also knew that his perspective and his wisdom was generation bound and that the next generation and nixon represented t
administration's benign neglect of the poor and studied indifference to civil rights, a lot of those who lived through this week in overton who seem toe think the best thing about george bush is he not ronald reagan. >>> largely as a result of the policies and priorities of the reagan administration more people are becoming poor and staying poor in this country than anytime since world war ii. ♪ . >> if there is thinking left to ronald reagan's trickle down theory, done, it seems to be anxiety which seems to be trickng down through just about every segment of our society. ♪ . >> if you gave clarence thomas a little flower on his face you would think you had david duke talking. here is a man who, is against everything that has lifted the level of life of millions of blacks. ♪ . >> i hope his wife feeds him lots of eggs and butter and dies like many black men do of heart disease. that is how i feel. he is absolutely reprehensible person. ♪ . >> you've called gingrich and his ilk, your words, trickle down terrorists who base their agenda on exclusion, and fear. do you think middle class a
tribe members to the reservation. a rather and curious howard noticed that his right arm is gone. he had amputated during the civil war. insert a very hard with two of his grandsons, all of whom have fallen into military service. this is very, very late in life for him. and then finally i'm ultimately, a group shot that shows howard sitting right there, along with all the great white men who at the time formed the visiting board for bowdoin college. josh malone chamberlain, who also was a renowned civil war service is also shown in this picture. he is right there. so those are the two gentlemen. chamberlin and howard were two years apart. chamberlain was five for 52, howard class of 50. they came to have not interacted much when they were here. they do share a dorm, but not a dorm room. so we didn't know too much in the early years about whether they were friendly. certainly later in life they were. and then finally, a picture of howard along with other distinguished alums, including chief justice fuller, who was seated next to howard they are, who is also a member of the board at the ti
: pamela geller with the american freedom defense initiative won the right to hang posters which read, in any war between civilized man and the savage, support civilized man. support israel. defeat jihad. those same posters will be going up at four d.c. area metro stations before the close of business today. already, metro riders here are speaking out against the move. >> because it is not right to gemmize that jihad, the extremist terroristed and generalize the muslims alls this. i don't approve of that at all. >> i think they should be allowed on free speech grounds but i think it is incredibly irresponsible. >> it is kind of a big thing to call somebody a savage but this is america. freedom of speech. >> reporter: metro went to court after receiving what it called verifiable threats over the poster and out of concern over the recent riots in islamic nations over a california film ridiculing the prophet mohammed. >> even though you have a right to say it, doesn't mean you have to say it. >> i believe that even though it might be going up in the d.c. area, other countries will look a
's called stirring the pot. if that shook you, read this. >> in any war between the civilized man and the savage, support the civilized man. >> reporter: it's the kind of ad that attracts controversy and handcuffs. >> do you have a right to do that? >> i do, actually, and i'm doing that right now and you should get out of my way. >> tell me what i'm under arrest for? >> reporter: that was in new york city. the controversial ads are hitting metro stations here. the woman behind them equally controversial blogger, pamela gellar. >> the ads were submitted because they were antiisrael ads running in the metro transit authority so our ads are submitted as a counter to those anti-israel ads. >> i think it's provocative in a bad way. >> it certainly makes you stop and think. >> probably emotional. emotions will be sparked by it. >> defend racism. >> reporter: while this woman, an egyptian born journalist may have taken her defense a little too far, some say this ad could spark more than spray paint. >> i have been many acts of vandalism and violence against muslims, and these happen be
voters. coach makes a good point. civilized debate is always the way to go. >> that's what we do every day. >> yeah, right. >> tom kierein is here with our forecast. hi, tom. >> good morning. there is the washington monument and jefferson memorial. so far they are dry. >>> just a few miles away, it's raining, and it's wet, and the pavement is wet. if you're coming in down through 70 or in from 66 this morning, all coming from a conveyor belt of rain associated with a front and an area of low pressure. right now closer to home, we're getting closer to moderate rain. right now raining pretty hard from right near burke, virginia, in western fairfax county through northern prince william from manassas to hay market, and then across northern fauquier county up through front royal. moderate rain in loudoun county, panhandle of west virginia too, and up toward hagerstown. this is going to be heading toward frederick in the next half hour. closer to washington, just a few sprinkles around the immediate metro area. some of those showers moving right into the western suburbs. just near 60 montgo
state, psychologists, civil attorneys and other accusers. they won. >> you have a brand new statement from one of sandusky's victims? >> reporter: that's right. some of them will address the court directly. others will have statements read for them. but this is an exserpt from a victim who will speak in court and it says in part i hope and pray that when your honor sentences mr. sandusky you consider the real harm he's done to me and others and take into account the tears, pain and private anguish and others have suffered. again we'll hear from him as well as some others too. >> susan, what about the jurors? they were the ones who rendered this decision. i understand you spoke to one. >> reporter: that's right. they want closure too. this juror says she knows of at least four all together who will be here in the courtroom. what do they want to hear? they want to hear an apology. doesn't sound like they will get one. >> susan candiotti -- >> like to hear him say he's sorry and i want him to apologize and to recognize that what he did was wrong. but i don't believe that's what i'm going
, but avoidable. the rid-x septic subscriber program helps prevent backups by sending you monthly doses right to your door so you will never forget to maintain your system. sign up at rid-x.com. [ bottle #2 ] i heard it came from space... nooo! ...from a very clean alien civilization. that's crazy. crazy clean. whaaaaat?! come on... [ male announcer ] mr. clean magic eraser bath scrubber. its clean is out of this world. >>> we touched on the presidential race earlier but maybe the biggest political news came on "saturday night live." >> big bird got his chance to go rogue. and we have the details. >> reporter: big bird took the high road on "saturday night liv live". >> before we go, do you have a political statement you would like to make? >> no, i don't want to ruffle any feathers. >> but feathers were ruffled. >> i will stop the subsidy to pbs. i like big bird. i like you, too. >> somebody is finally getting tough on big bird. >> keeping the fight alive over government spending. so was it a mistake targeting america's favorite yellow bird? >> it was not a target. it was pointing to one exa
helps prevent backups by sending you monthly doses right to your door so you will never forget to maintain your system. sign up at rid-x.com. right after this. >>> i think that's a special theme song for thursday, for those of you that can't wait for thursday night's vice presidential debate, there was something to ease their cravings over the weekend. >> that was the debate between cable tv heavyweights between bill o'reilly and jon stewart. we have the blow-by-blow. >> we are merely weeks from being a failed state, or even worse, greece, and the way to solve it is to kill big bird. >> it's the debate the election season is clocking in the time. >> can i have one of the cards for this? >> fox news anchor bill o'reilly -- >> adios, sinai raw, it's boring. >> he took on jon stewart in a 90-minute debate saturday night with topics ranging from funding cbs. >> give me the money back, the children's television is -- >> to texas? >> why if you take advantage of a tax break and you are a corporation, you are a smart businessman but if you take advantage of something that you need not
in it's approach, and we believe it's not the right way to do it. if you look at precedence using the civil aviation organization for consensus building on international aviation issues, is it much more effective way to do this. we have been clear both on p the record, off the record, and at every level with our e.u. counterparts that this is unacceptable, that we do not support it. if you look closely at the reaction around the world, you'll see that we have a lot of other nations in concert with the united states who also believe the unilateral imposition of that emissions trading scheme is inappropriate. finally, there appears to be some recognition on the european side of late that there are real consequences for doing this. we will continue to press for the appropriate avenues for the resolution of an issue like this. we are continuing to make it clear that we have serious concerns and do not believe it should be implemented, and i think the consequences of the european union moving ahead unilaterally are much butter under by the e.u. these days. >> thank you. >> mr. chairma
. is it hard? sometimes. is it is agreeable? sometimes. is it the right thing? all the time. i bet if we can get lincoln to come back and we could ask him how hard the civil war was and how hard being president was whether or not he would say to you if it was worth it but i am willing to bet that if you were to ask washington to come back and asked him whether it was leaving the family to fight at valley forge you say it is worth mount vernon to leave to go to the constitutional convention. you would say it is worth it to leave to become president. you would say it is worth it. all of the absentees, all of the day's i think they would say at. i am booker t. washington, frederick douglass, and i keep those around me to remind me what our obligations are. yours and mine. >> the first time i think i heard you you were talking of the declaration of independent which mr. lincoln a alludes to write out of the gate in the gettysburg address. that's 1863 kutz 1776 when you do the math. many quotes from the declaration and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal that is the langua
's he doing? writing notes for the next debate? >> right. >> yeah. the split screens were jarring a little bit. one thing to point out, it may not amount to much, but it's worth mentioning is it was a remarkably not only substantive but civil debate. the way they came out. mitt romney's congratulations about the anniversary felt heartfelt. the way that president obama looked at him and nodded quite often. they went at it. they had a smart intellectual debate, but they did it in a civil way. and the one thing, though, that was not there that we took for granted was the 47% comment. i thought that was going to be the theme of the debate. >> my god, why not hammer that home? >> why not? why not? >> the bain record. there were a lot of things. i think part of the thing that's going on with president obama was, a lot of his debate prep was designed to make sure that he preserved his main asset in this race, which is his likability. that they know how important that is. he doesn't really like mitt romney at all. he has a lot of contempt for romney. and i think a lot of his preparation w
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)